“No Parking” on Cool Spring Rd at 26th Ave

The following text is quoted from a letter sent to residents along the affected area. Please keep this in mind in case you drive to the NWB trailhead to walk – popular parking spots are no longer allowed!

“Dear Resident:

The Department of Public Works and Transportation (DPW&T) recently investigated parking conditions along the north side of Cool Spring Road in front of your residence and we are writing to inform you of the findings. DPW&T’s Traffic Safety Division determined that vehicles parked along the north side of Cool Spring Road near 26th Avenue create a potential traffic safety concern.

Specifically, we determined that vehicles parked along the north side of the Cool Spring Road are forcing westbound Cool Spring Road motorists to cross the double-yellow center line into the eastbound travel lanes. Over the last three (3) years, this situation has led to several collisions involving vehicles traveling in opposing directions (head-on) and parked vehicles being struck. It should be noted that the Maryland Vehicle Law prohibits vehicles from parking in a manner that decreases the width of the travel lane to less than nine feet wide or forces a motorist to cross the center line of a roadway.

To address this concern, we have determined that the appropriate traffic safety option requires prohibiting parking in this area in order to provide for a travel lane of a  sufficient safe width. In January, DPW&T will install “No Parking Any Time” signs along the north side of Cool Spring Road, beginning at a point approximately 115 feet wets of 26th Avenue and continuing east to a point approximately 400 feet east of 26th Avenue. The parking prohibition area includes the frontages of 2500 Cool Spring Road through 2510 Cool Spring Road and along the side of 8300 6th Avenue. The signs should be installed within the next two (2) to three (3) weeks, weather conditions permitting. Also, we regret to inform you that it is not possible to install “tree box cut-aways” (thereby creating a parking bay) at this location since the width of the pavement is insufficient to accommodate parking and the required two (2) lanes of travel.

While we recognize the inconvenience that the parking prohibition action may create for residents in the area, DPW&T is responsible for providing a safe travel environment for all County citizens. If you have any questions or need additional information, please feel free to contact Mr. Armen Abrahamian, Chief, Traffic Safety Division, Office of Engineering and Project Management, at (301)883-5641.”


CSR “No Parking” letter pdf

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Update on “NO PARKING” locations in the CSTCA Community

  • Corner of 26th Ave and Cool Spring Rd., extending along 138 feet on Cool Spring (in the direction of Riggs Road)
  • 26th Avenue (east side) and along Pawnee and Navajo (north side). These signs will be intermittent (alternate sides) to allow for sight distance of vehicles (particularly emergency vehicles, school buses), thereby increasing safety of members of the community, cars and incoming vehicles.

DPWT has already laid down the street notations. If any of the above is unclear, look for the white notations marked on these streets. These will mark the locations for the new signage.

Lastly, parking is prohibited within 30ft of any “STOP” sign.  These measures will be strictly enforced beginning mid-January 2018.  For your convenience, we have included the Maryland Code on Transportation.


Maryland Transportation Section 21-1003 (Article – Transportation)

Opinion on Question D from Delegate Joseline Peña-Melnyk

We have been asked to post the following letter from Delegate Joseline Peña-Melnyk on the Cool Spring Terrace website.


Dear Neighbors and Fellow Prince Georgians:

Election Day is just around the corner and early voting starts today. While many of us are absorbed by the presidential race, I am writing to draw your attention to an important issue at the bottom of the ballot: Question D.

I am opposed to Question D and I am writing to tell you why.

What Question D is About

Question D requests consent from voters to add two additional council seats to our county council. The two additional seats will be at-large seats. It will raise the total number of council seats to 11 ( 9 district + 2 at-large). The two at-large seats will have separate two-term limits. So, for example, a district council member who has served two terms would immediately be eligible to run for two additions terms as an at-large council member.

Some facts about Question D

It will cost the County over $1 million each year to fund the two additional seats.

Running countywide is expensive. Previous countywide races have cost between $300,000 to $400,000; over $1 million was spent for the last County Executive race. Developers and special interests will fund their candidates who will run on slates with Senators or the Executive, while grassroots candidates will find it very difficult to compete effectively. The at-large council member will be responsive to funders and not to the people. Let’s get public financing for council candidates in Prince George’s before we debate at-large seats.

We already know from the October 9th Campaign Finance Report that $30,000 was given by developers to Recharge At-Large, the Ballot Committee promoting Question D. There will be much more in developer contributions before Election Day. If Question D will be so good for the County, why are developers pushing it? Don’t be fooled by the “Democratic Sample Ballots” being mailed by them.

I believe it is Important to Respect the Voice of the People

Question D circumvents term limits. Term limits in Prince George’s were placed on the charter through a citizen-driven initiative. Some elected officials have repeatedly attempted to second-guess the intent of voters and overturn term limits. Their attempts have failed three times; Question D is the fourth attempt. One of the reasons I oppose Question D because I think it is important to respect the will of the people.

Just last year, the County Council, facilitated by a state law voted on by my colleagues, chose to increase the property tax rate. I voted against the state bill in the General Assembly that made it possible for the county council to circumvent TRIM and I opposed the tax rate increase publicly.

If adding at-large seats, changing term limits, or repealing TRIM will improve county governance, it is incumbent on elected officials to initiate that discussion at the community level and not support stealth measures to undermine what voters have placed in the Charter.

For all these reasons, I hope you will join me in Opposing Question D.

The Prince George’s Civic Federation is coordinating a citizen’s campaign against Question D. You can find more information at their website http://www.NoOnQuestionD.com

Best,

Joseline