Update on the Bradford Pear Replacement Program

Many of the curbside trees that were planted in our neighborhood last year are thriving, but several were not so lucky. Project coordinator Kimberly Moyer from the Neighborhood Design Center said that these losses “were probably due to drought stress in July.”

Blooming crape myrtle on Navahoe Street (Photo by Andrea Kenner, Aug. 17, 2013)

Blooming crape myrtle on Navahoe Street (Photo by Andrea Kenner, Aug. 17, 2013)

In a recent assessment, the county identified 11 trees in the Cool Spring Terrace neighborhood that need to be replaced. An additional assessment will be done later this year to determine if any additional trees should be added to that list.

In the meantime, you can help keep your new curbside trees healthy and strong by ensuring that they receive the proper amount of water. In their brochure, New Tree Care and Maintenance, the Neighborhood Design Center provides these watering guidelines:

“Watering newly planted trees is essential for their survival in the first year of establishment. Usually the trees are planted with a ring of mulch around the tree, which we refer to as the “mulch saucer.” The saucer helps collect and contain water around the base of the tree. For each watering, slowly fill up the saucer with 1-2 gallons of water and let the water soak into the soil. If no mulch ring is visible, a slow gentle soaking with 1-2 gallons is the preferred way to water. The trees would like to be watered three times a week in hot summer months (5 gallons per week total), twice a week in early fall (3 gallons per week total) and once a week in spring (1-2 gallons per week total).”

If you would like a PDF copy of the full brochure, call the Neighborhood Design Center at 301-779-6010.

As we learn more, we will keep you informed about the status of the tree replacement project.

Advertisements